Manage Your Boss

Manage Your Boss

Peter Drucker, the father of modern management, once said that when he asked employees to tell him something about their jobs they inevitably began by telling him about their boss. “If I only know how to manage the boss.” Therefore, he dedicated an entire chapter named, “Managing the Boss” in his famous academic book called “Management.”

Drucker reckons that managing the boss is both an opportunity and a responsibility and outlines seven specific strategies to success:

  • Make a “boss list.”
  • Asking each for his or her input, and giving each your input
  • Enabling them to perform
  • Playing to the manager’s strengths
  • Keeping managers informed
  • Protecting bosses from surprises
  • Never underrating bosses

We outline here seven more:

When you accept a task, your boss expects and relies on you to get the job done. If you are serious about impressing your boss, you better get it done as if your life depended on it. Never promise anything to your boss if you are not confident of doing the job. When the boss sees you as a person who keeps promises on a consistent basis, it is much easier to be in friendly terms. And your credibility as a person would rise a few notches up.

Bosses need cooperation and honesty from their direct reports. Subordinates, on the other hand, require managers to set priorities and make critical resources available promptly to conduct the work efficiently. Smoother the operation, better the relationship between the worker and the boss. It requires the employee to understand the personality traits, communication preferences, and subtle nuances of the bosses and adapt their working style accordingly. Because, after all, success in the workplace depends on your adaptability. The boss needs you as much as you need him/her. Hence establish a working relationship that is compatible to both of you.

If the boss is not aware of certain trends in the market that could derail your plan it is better to disclose that at an early stage so that nothing comes as a surprise. Moreover, the boss may be able to put measures in place that can mitigate risks and help you get on with your assignment without any disruption. Any manager would appreciate a trend-spotter in the organization. In fact, it is an essential skill of a competent employee. It is also a commendable trait to have a conversation about the potential challenges you could face in carrying out your project due to the upcoming trends. Agree on a plan of action and provide periodic updates.

Even if you think you have the permission to be casual with your boss do not go overboard in your friendliness. Keep a professional distance that is acceptable to both of you taking into consideration the company culture and the norms of the workplace. Your professionalism will also stand you in good stead when your boss does your annual appraisal or when considering promotions within or between departments. Developing a professional relationship can earn you your boss’s respect and admiration and will also set a good example for new recruits and junior employees. If you think things are not going well, handle it in a professional manner rather than let your emotions take control.

Bosses can be under immense pressure and may falter in performing the necessary managerial roles. It can have an unintended adverse effect on your job performance. Try to find out the reasons and politely discuss this with your boss but never confront because confrontation can deteriorate the relationship. It is feasible to manage the challenges with an open discussion and debate successfully. If needed, include a trusted HR personnel or a departmental colleague who can assist you in augmenting your arguments. That way you can have an eye witness to the discussion that happened between you and your boss.

Send your messages across to the boss using the right strategies. When you have an important point to stress that can benefit the whole company and have a positive impact on the bottom line try to demonstrate the highlights using either a spreadsheet or a visual demo. Remember most people are visuals. Zero in on what matters to the boss the most. Then hone in and use your persuasive skills. It is especially useful if your ideas and concepts are innovative and novel. You may be asked to repeat the demonstration during the staff meeting for everyone to see. It is often a good sign as it shows that you have got your boss’ attention.

  • Leave your boss

    You may reach a point where you have tried all the strategies mentioned above, and none sufficed. Well, time to quit. A vast majority of workers leave jobs because of an unmanageable boss. It is better to look for greener pastures than to be stuck in a rut. Employees spend a good portion of the waking hours at the workplace. If an unhappy boss is making the workplace toxic, you should do yourself a favor and get out of the negative atmosphere. An ideal situation would be to find another job before you leave so that you do not have to feel the pressure of mounting bills. If you have an approachable colleague, who can understand you, feel free to discuss the matter with him/her.

We have come a long way from the time Peter Drucker outlined the seven strategies on how to manage the boss. Although all of them are still relevant, the organizational dynamics and employee roles have changed slightly and required additional tactics. Moreover, the rise of technology-based jobs and the entrance of Millennials into the job market have added to the complexity of the dynamics.

How to Build Your Company with only High Potentials

How to Build Your Company with only High Potentials

Hire for potential, retain through training, and charge with autonomy

HR executives recruit candidates based on the accomplishments they see on their resumes. And they fail so miserably because it relies on the flawed assumption that people who have done well in the past would do equally well or better in the future. Accomplishments are previous results. On the other hand, candidates who have been hired without any accomplishments but purely because the CEO or the top management believed in him or her, have proven to succeed so spectacularly. Why? The answer is potential.

Potential is the ability to adapt to increasingly complex roles and environments. After hiring the high potentials, continuously keep them in a stimulating environment under which they thrive through leadership programs. Also, give them decision-making autonomy in their respective areas of leadership. So, the human resources professionals need a complete retraining that will offer an extraordinary opportunity for the company to exploit the human assets. The new skills they require are the following:

  • Hiring: How to spot potential
  • Retaining: Develop effective leadership-developing programs
  • Charging: Help the best get better by giving them autonomy

Let us examine them one by one.

1) Hiring

Candidates must have not only the right skills but also the potential to learn new ones. Competency-based appointments are increasingly becoming insufficient. That is because what makes someone successful today in a particular role under certain circumstances might not tomorrow because of the ever-changing competitive environment, the dynamic company strategy and the need to manage and work with a different group of colleagues. What is required is the potential of the candidate to fit into future roles. Unfortunately, a candidate’s potential is much harder to discern than competence. Consider Egon Zehnder who developed and refined an empirically validated model over two decades with a predictive accuracy of 85%. In conclusion, this model predicts potential based on five indicators:

  • Motivation: pursuit of challenging goals
  • Curiosity: explore new ideas and avenues
  • Insight: see connections where others do not
  • Engagement: with their work and colleagues
  • Determination: overcome setbacks and obstacles

Perhaps the CEOs who took a leap of faith and hired a candidate who did not have any past accomplishments to show for must have subconsciously seen all the above qualities in him or her. They were competent people with potential. Sadly, most organizations have HR professionals who kill off good candidates and endorse bad ones. The best interviewers’ assessments and the right kind of hiring can vastly improve the odds.

So, of what are high potentials made?

The superior level of performance of high potentials is consistent in a variety of circumstances and settings. Moreover, they have a high propensity to grow and succeed faster and more efficiently than their co-workers. They are three distinct qualities in high-achievers. They are broadly categorized as performance, behavior, and X-factors as illustrated in the table below.

Performance Behavior X factors
Deliver results strongly – credibly Recognize that action counts A drive to excel
Master new types of expertise Exhibit behavior that reflects the culture of their companies A catalytic learning capability
Perform with distinction with a broad range of stakeholders Demonstrate company values in an exemplary manner An enterprising spirit
Competence not at the expense of someone else Be a role model and teacher Dynamic sensors

2) Retaining

After hiring the real high potentials, focus on keeping them not only because of the tendency to fall off voluntarily but also because the talent market is very tight. Make sure that the candidates live up to the high potential spotted in them by offering them future leadership assignments. Companies have targeted leadership development opportunities, job rotations, stretch assignments, and executive programs designed to nurture high-achieving individuals. They push their high-achievers up a straight ladder toward bigger budgets, bigger jobs, and a larger team. These measures have managed to continue their growth but not unleash their ultimate potential. According to a research 40% of internal job moves by “high potentials” have failed because of the following flawed assumptions of senior managers.

  • Assumed that high potentials are highly engaged
  • Equated current high performance with future potential
  • Delegated down the management of top talent
  • Shielded rising stars from early derailment
  • Expected star employees to share the pain
  • Failed to link the stars to corporate strategy

A disciplined approach is needed. Leadership development initiatives should reflect the needs of the rising stars and align with organizational goals. Make sure that the job rotations and relevant stretch assignments they are getting suit their temperaments and aptitudes.

3) Charging

Hiring for potentials and providing them with the proper training is not the end of it. Keeping them in the company without the competitors luring them away is another challenge. There are some proven strategies that management can adopt to keep the top potentials who have attended the leadership program engaged, motivated and driven. They need to reinforce and explicitly express that the “high potential” title is not only an acknowledgment of past accomplishment but also of future potential. Also, give them autonomy in the following four “T” dimensions: Task, Time, Team, Technique

We cannot predict the competencies and skills needed to succeed in the future because of the dynamic nature of geopolitics, business environment, competitive landscape and the tight talent market. It is, therefore, imperative to hire and nurture people with the highest potential and not just those who have proved their abilities in the past. That doesn’t mean forgetting factors like intelligence, experience, specific competencies, performance, and leadership skills. But the implication is that companies should hire competent people with potential. Recognize their competence and potential by enrolling them in an executive development program. And finally, cultivate a sense of ownership in them by giving them autonomy in the decision-making. Thus, hiring for potential, retaining them at every level of the organization, and charging them by giving them independence are the key success factors of the most admired companies in the world.

35 Famous Quotes about Product

35 Famous Quotes about Product

  • Steve Jobs

You’ve got to start with the customer experience and work back toward the technology – not the other way around.

  • Alan Musk

Any product that needs a manual to work is broken.

  • Peter Drucker

Quality in a product or service is not what the supplier puts in. it is what the customer gets out and is willing to pay for. A product is not quality because it is hard to make and costs a lot of money, as manufacturers typically believe.

  • Stephen King

A product is something made in a factory; a brand is something that is bought by the customer. A product can be copied by a competitor; a brand is unique. A product can be quickly outdated; a successful brand is timeless.

  • Thomas Watson

Great design will not sell an inferior product, but it will enable a great product to achieve its maximum potential.

  • Lee Iacocca

When the product is right, you don’t have to be a great Marketer.

  • Seth Godin

Don’t find customers for your products, find products for your customers.

  • David Ogilvy

Good products can be sold by honest advertising. If you don’t think the product is good, you have no business to be advertising it.

  • Zig Ziglar

If you believe your product or service can fulfill a true need, it’s your moral obligation to sell it.

  • Eleanor Roosevelt

Happiness is not a goal; it is a by-product.

  • W Edwards Deming

You cannot inspect quality into the product; it is already there.

  • Recep Tayyip Erdogan

According to this view, democracy is a product of western culture, and it cannot be applied to the Middle East which has a different cultural, religious, sociological and historical background.

  • Bob Geldof

Divorce is a by-product of the fact that maybe the nuclear unit is gone.

  • Alan Cumming

My feeling about work is it’s much more about the experience of doing is than the end product. Sometimes things that are really great and make lots of money are miserable to make, and vice versa.

  • Henry Ford

A market is never saturated with a good product, but it is very quickly saturated with a bad one.

  • Stephen Covey

I am not a product of my circumstances. I am a product of my decisions.

  • Calvin Klein

The only way to advertise is by not focusing on the product.

  • Miley Cyrus

I hate bring thought of as a product.

  • Estee Lauder

If you don’t sell, it’s not the product that’s wrong, it’s you.

  • Marissa Mayer

Product management really is the fusion between technology, what engineers do and the business side.

  • Philip Kotler

The sales department isn’t the whole company, but the whole company better be the sales department.

  • Gary Hamel

Alan Kay’s famous aphorism is that perspective is worth 80 IQ points. An innovative insight is not the product of an individual’s brilliance. It’s not as if innovators’ heads are wired in different ways. Innovation typically comes from looking at the world through a slightly different lens

  • Jack Welch

Shareholder value is a result, not a strategy … Your main constituencies are your employees, your customers and your products.

  • Lady Gaga

I already am a product

  • Ross Perot

Business is not just doing deals; business is having great products, doing great engineering, and providing tremendous service to customers. Finally, business is a cobweb of human relationships.

  • Jeff Bezos

I strongly believe that missionaries make better products. They care more. For a missionary, it’s not just about the business. There has to be a business, and the business has to make sense, but that’s not why you do it. You do it because you have something that motivates you.

  • Richard Branson

We experiment endlessly, with new products, new companies and new marketing. A successful business the emphasis is on experiment and development, ideas are the lifeblood of business.

  • Clayton M. Christensen

A disruptive innovation is a technologically simple innovation in the form of a product, service, or business model that takes root in a tier of the market that is unattractive to the established leaders in an industry.

  • Billy Joel

Have you listened to the radio lately? Have you heard the canned, frozen and processed product being dished up to the world as American popular music today?

  • Tom Ford

When you are having fun, and creating something you love, it shows in the product. So, when a woman is sifting through a rack of clothes, somehow that piece of clothing that you had so much fun designing speaks to her; she responds to it and buys it. I believe you can actually transfer that energy to material things as you’re creating them.

  • Donald Trump

Mitt – what I speak to Mitt Romney about is jobs. What I speak to Mitt Romney about is China, because he’s got a great view on China and how they’re trying to destroy our country by taking our jobs and making our product and manipulating their currency, so that it makes it almost impossible for our companies to compete.

  • Robert Kiyosaki

Most businesses think that product is the most important thing, but without great leadership, mission and a team that deliver results at a high level, even the best product won’t make a company successful.

  • Boone Pickens

I don’t go cheap on anything, but I’m not a shopper. If I want something, I look at it, decide what it is, but it will usually be the best product. I’ve got a pair of loafers that I still wear that I got in 1957.

  • Tm Cook

Price is rarely the most important thing. A cheap product might sell some units. Somebody gets it home and they feel great when they pay the money, but then they get it home and use it and the joy is gone.

  • Cary Grant

We have our factory, which is called a stage. We make a product, we color it, we title it and we ship it out in cans.