6 Ways to Communicate New Campaigns to the Salesforce

6 Ways to Communicate New Campaigns to the Salesforce

What is the best way to communicate new campaigns to the salesforce? Traditionally there has been a constant tension between sales and marketing. The tension escalates when the marketing department designs a campaign to increase the sales of a particular product or a season without the input of the sales staff. Often the person in charge of marketing campaigns senses a disconnect between the marketing team and Sales team. Successful marketing cannot happen in a silo. It has to happen with the buy-in from the Sales team. Happy salespeople build lasting customer connections. Today, there is an urgent need to converge both the sales and marketing teams together to accomplish the desired results. The Marketing leader can adopt some proven methods to get the group to own the campaign.

Engage Sales early

If the Sales team is accountable for the success of a particular project or campaign, gain their buy-in early. Not after the campaign launch. The sales team are constantly in touch with the customers on a regular basis. Hence they can be a valuable source of strategic as well as tactical input. They can also drive creative thinking. Bring the sales force early on. It can be the most efficient strategy to find out how the target market will respond to the marketing campaign. Perfect the campaign at the initial stage itself with advice from the sales department. Then during the campaign, not much tweaking would be required.

Demystify the clutter

As a marketer, it is important to explain to the sales representatives the mechanics involved in the campaigns. Avoid using jargon as far as possible as it would only add to the confusion. Make it easy for them to implement the campaign. Telling a compelling story, pointing the team to an important thought leader in the field, and illustrating it with a diagram are all tactics that can help the team better understand the objectives that the campaign is meant to achieve. A better-informed sales rep does a better job in supporting the marketing team in their campaigns.

Address the pain points promptly

Before launching a new campaign, the sales team goes through a learning curve. The duration of the learning time differs from one person to another depending on their learning propensity. Marketers should work hand in hand with the sales team to identify the pain points involved and address them in real time. Sometimes the team has a good understanding of the process. However, they waste an enormous amount of time during each step of the process that would ideally take a far lesser amount of time. This wastage of time should also be addressed using automated workflows, educational slide decks, and if needed by installing an internal CRM software.

Show them what’s in it for them

Each team member in the sales department is different. So are the personal aims.  Meet with each to find out what they are and relate the corporate goals to each person’s goals. Show them how the management can help them achieve these aims by accomplishing the company goals. After that, let them know that the communication lines are open to deal with any concerns, complaints, and ideas they may have as they go along. Give them the necessary training and tools required to roll out the campaign successfully. The sales team will then start feeling encouraged and motivated to be on the side of marketing.

Personalize tasks

Make sure the campaign tasks assigned to each member of the team play to their strengths. There is nothing more inefficient than putting people in mismatching tasks. People love to do those tasks that they are good at doing. It motivates them and keeps them productive. Then set measurable goals consensually and hold them accountable as agreed. Allow them to have a say in the improvisation process going forward. Paint the bigger picture and remind them why it matters to the company as a whole and how their personal goals and career advancement fit into the grand scheme of things.

Keep the team informed with regular updates

Keep the sales members regularly informed about the progress of the campaign through daily briefings, staff meetings, newsletters, etc. the staff will then start to see results as and when they happen and will feel valued by the management for their contribution. If there are any areas of the campaign that needs catching up, this will help the team come up with ways to bring the campaign back on the trail and forward. The methods thus suggested can also make their jobs much easier while enabling them to spend their valuable time on closing deals with qualified leads.

In larger corporations, it is a common practice to find task force teams set up around projects. Each of them would consist of 5 to7 members whose mandate it is to recommend ideas around an issue. The entire team agrees that they would strictly adhere to the recommendations thus made. In most cases, this arrangement has produced phenomenal results.

Companies launch marketing campaigns and promotions in response to varying market trends and consumer tastes. It is often the key responsibility area of a high-level Marketing Director or Business Development Manager who have a say in designing the campaign. Doing so without the input or feedback of the salespeople is doomed to failure. It is imperative to get the buy-in of the people who sell the products to the end-users. The success of the campaign, thus, to a large extent depends on including the salespeople in the decision-making process.

Photo Credit: Olu Eletu

Three Fs for Writing a Business Plan

Three Fs for Writing a Business Plan

Writing a real business plan comes innately only to a few. And that too after much skill. Those few may have chosen it as a career. Sometimes people in the academe write them for firms to earn a living. While the task is a chore to many, for beginners it is a complete riddle. Start-ups find themselves compelled to write one for various reasons. The most common reason among them is to raise funds. People also write such plans for private investors. The aim then to get them to invest money in the firm. Another motive is to raise the stake in the firm. Also, entrepreneurs write them while seeking for new business. Even to sell the firm. Not knowing how to write one can be a nightmare. Here we give you a practical approach. We hope it can serve as a basic guideline.

Writing a Business Plan

Writing a real business plan comes innately only to a few. And that too after much skill. Those few may have chosen it as a career. Sometimes people in the academe write them for firms to earn a living. Even to sell the firm. Here we give you a practical approach.

Framing

Many people fail in their attempts to sit down and write a business plan. Because they face starting problems. An outline can help in overcoming the problem. Outlining involves jotting down what to write. Bear in mind the purpose of drafting the plan. Write as if you are talking to the target reader. In addition, think about who would be reading it. And draft an outline of what kind of info or data to include in it. Start writing the business plan section by section. This way provides a unified and logical flow to the rest of the content. It then becomes easier to arrange facts. Then start compiling them in a clear manner. Such a framework would appeal to the right audience.

Writing a business plan

Many people fail in their attempts to sit down and write a business plan. Because they face starting problems. An outline can help in overcoming the problem.

Filling

This stage is known as mapping scheme because it involves forming the exact order of sections. Delve deeper and write each area concisely for greater clarity. Planning stage is the muscles and flesh. It makes the content rich. Well, the target reader should find solid evidence of the business plan here. It would also enforce the standing of the plan. A few writing skills are needed here to make the concepts and ideas compelling.

Writing a Business Plan

This stage is known as mapping scheme because it involves forming the exact order of sections. Also called planning stage. Planning stage is the muscles and flesh. It makes the content rich. Well, the target reader should find solid evidence of the business plan here.

Finalizing

The draft is still rough at this stage as it needs some final touches. The next step is to edit it from top to bottom. Editing gives coherence and a smooth flow to the arguments expressed in the business plan. People write business plans to make a case. Hence it needs winning power. Repeat the main points throughout the document. For more emphasis furnish it with facts and figures. Make sure to use logic. Reasoning backed by information that was stated earlier in the plan can make arguments clearer. Edit the business plan further by paying attention to the smallest details. Fine-tuning the business plan in a detail oriented manner increases the readability of the document. If possible, let a third person review it for further refinement.

Writing a Business Plan

People write business plans to make a case. Hence it needs winning power.

A universally accepted and a regular business plan template is as follows:

  • Executive Summary: Executive summary is the most important part of a business plan. Ideally it highlights the strengths of the company. This part briefs the reader the competitive advantage of the business. Briefly summarize why you have the best business idea. It is a snapshot statement of the program of activities as a whole. It touches on the company profile and typically runs from 3 to 4 pages in length.
  • Company Overview: It should start by providing a brief history of the group ownership. It then goes on to describe the organization of the enterprise. A timeline as to when the business was founded is equally important. Information such as locations and facilities should also be included. Add the names of the key members of the management team. Profiling their backgrounds is an indicator of a well-thought-out business plan too.
  • Industry Analysis: This section requires substantial research. It gives an understanding of the external factors of the playing field and how the company responds to them. Explain what the cyclical changes are, profit opportunities, and how the company fits into the industry.
  • Market Analysis: The objective of market analysis is to provide a quantitative and qualitative assessment of the market. Such facts as demographics, segmentation, and market need are highly sought out by savvy investors. Market value, size, and regulation shows the investors that the business is lucrative enough.
  • Competitive Analysis: Identify the competitors’ strengths and weaknesses. A distinct advantage of the firm over the competition is a prerequisite for a business plan. The unique competitive strategies will set the company apart from others. Discuss here, if any, any barriers to entry and exit into the market.
  • Customer Analysis: This is a critical section that defines the characteristics of the target customer. Usually the characteristics are explained through their buying criteria and how the product typically satisfies their needs. Include also an in-depth analysis of the growth of the customer base, their average revenues, and service delivery model.
  • Marketing Agenda: Emphasize the unique selling proposition of the business in this section. Along with that the pricing and positioning strategy and distribution plan should also be included. A marketing plan that outlines the steps taken to retain existing customers or gain new customers will add credibility.
  • Strategy and Implementation: Insert in this segment a detailed plan of the marketing strategy and its implementation. It typically articulates how the company’s management intends to reach the products to the market. It includes the sales strategy, personnel hire, promotions and advertisement, distribution outlets, pricing, service delivery, guarantee policies and the like. Emphasis would be on past sales and a sales forecast.
  • Organization and Management: Highlight who does what and their added value to the company. It is a simple but effective way to portray an organizational chart with a narrative. This section would reassure the investor that the people onboard are more than names on the organizational diagram.
  • Financial Plan: Most investors are visuals. So, set up a spreadsheet with the past sales, sales forecast, and expense budget. It is also a good idea to incorporate a cash flow statement, assets, and liabilities. Some investors may require a breakeven analysis and the cost of doing business. A business planning software can be an invaluable help here.
  • Appendix: In general, this section holds the entire supporting documents. All that information that was too large to be included in the main body should go in here. Any figures, statistics, charts, graphs and illustrations that augment the main points in the body must be in this section.

3F plan provides a systematic and practical approach to preparing a business plan. It has been proven to bring success to budding entrepreneurs. Bear in mind to also study the target readers. And finally tweak the plan stressing those areas that would appeal to them. Good luck!

Title Photo Credit: Helloquence

The Best Sales Promotion, Before, During and After

The Best Sales Promotion, Before, During and After

The objective of the best sales promotion is to increase sales for a particular product through stimulating additional demand for the product. The end goal is to generate revenue over and above the standard. And the intent is almost always a short-term gain, unlike some marketing strategies that are designed to create customer loyalty, brand awareness and long-term return on investment. Successful promotions are the ones that have struck a chord with the intended audience and have met the desired results of increased business. Companies replace the non-performing promotional activities with performing ones to maximize the benefit.

What is it that makes some campaigns successful and others not? Here we dissect the variables involved pre-promotion, during and after the promotion. Usually, a particular successful promotional campaign may not have had all the factors described here, but a majority of them have. A careful analysis of such ingredients can help companies replicate the successful promotions and roll them out in another market or on a wider scale in the same market. On the other hand, the strategies that worked in the past may not necessarily work out in the future. So, it is recommended to exercise caution.

The primary variables involved in all promotional activities are the product, the market, the channel, the competition, and the budget. We examine the dynamics of each of these before the promotion, during and after the promotion.

Pre-promotion

  • Product: A promotional activity narrowly targets a small subset of the larger target market. The campaign should take into consideration what benefit of the product would appeal to the audience. The promotion should highlight that feature that closely corresponds to that interest.
  • Market: Understand the dynamics of the target audience and the stage in the product lifecycle. For example, how often does this market use the product? Conduct a preliminary research on the demographics and behavioral patterns of the market. Learn the cultural nuances of the area.
  • Channel: Depending on the target market decide on the mode of delivery that would most appeal to the target market. Then consider a variety of channels that would help meet the promotional goals. For example, retail outlets, malls, media, community centers, event venues, etc.
  • Competition: Find out if a direct or an indirect competitor has done a similar sales promotion. If so, what was the outcome? If the promotional activity has produced disappointing results, then there is no point in replicating it in the same market. It would end up in a waste of resources.
  • Budget: Work out every element of the promotion that would incur a direct and variable cost. It would be ideal if some partners can bear some costs or if other stakeholders involved could share them in return for a benefit. Agree upon the cost-sharing model in advance with all concerned.

During the Promotion

  • Product: Start a conversation with the customer through different media outlets before the promotional deal and communicate with them about the product’s features and benefits. Asking for personal references can work for high ticket items. Social media campaigns are very effective ways to hold a prominent position in people’s minds.
  • Market: Rather than a mass approach, acknowledge and re-engage with old customers as well as encourage new customers to try the product by offering free samples and demonstrations. Direct marketing in certain markets and products is a highly efficient way to reach out to high net worth individuals.
  • Channel: Help the customers make purchase decisions by making the product available as and when they require it using various channels. Motivate them to buy it by bringing the product to their doorstep. Try personal selling if appropriate when the customer appreciates a direct interaction on a one to one basis.
  • Competition: Differentiate the product from the rest. Provide technical information to the prospects on why the product is different. Emphasize on those qualities and advantages that allow the customers to ask relevant questions rather than giving a sales pitch. If possible, distribute special coupons with expiration dates.
  • Budget: For budget-constrained clients who show a serious interest in the product offer friendly payment terms in liaison with the local financial institutions. Create and foster brand loyalty by giving them various options on how they can conveniently get hold of the product. Offering them special deals is also a good way to seal deals faster.

Post-promotion

  • Product: Conduct a post-promotion analysis on what worked and did not work within the targeted audience. Consider what other benefits of the product were appealing. Fine-tune and replicate the ones that worked and discard the ones that did not.
  • Market: Make a note of the receptiveness and rejection of the customers to the product features. Create a qualified database of the old customers as well as the new ones in the market. Tweak the product if necessary and possible to adapt to the cultural sensitivity.
  • Channel: During the next promotion consider using only those modes of delivery and the channels that were beneficial and that brought the greatest return on investment. Do a survey directly with the first-time purchasers and regular purchases on the preferred usage of a channel.
  • Competition: Do a competitive analysis on other companies who are selling similar or augmented products. Rather than competing headlong, work out strategic partnerships to leverage the sales. Some tactical alliances with local partners can even bring the production cost down for both parties.
  • Budget: Calculate the cost incurred to carry out the promotion. Compare that to the incremental sales revenue obtained purely by carrying out the campaign. Work out the benefits and risks of the cost-sharing model. Post-promotion phase is a good time to evaluate the mode of payment most preferred by the target market.

 

The following matrix can help while doing a post-promotion analysis. The information filled out can be useful in designing an improvised promotion the next time.

Pre-promotion Promotion Post-promotion
Product
Market
Channel
Competition
Budget

Photo Credit: Roman Kraft