35 Famous Quotes about Product

35 Famous Quotes about Product

  • Steve Jobs

You’ve got to start with the customer experience and work back toward the technology – not the other way around.

  • Alan Musk

Any product that needs a manual to work is broken.

  • Peter Drucker

Quality in a product or service is not what the supplier puts in. it is what the customer gets out and is willing to pay for. A product is not quality because it is hard to make and costs a lot of money, as manufacturers typically believe.

  • Stephen King

A product is something made in a factory; a brand is something that is bought by the customer. A product can be copied by a competitor; a brand is unique. A product can be quickly outdated; a successful brand is timeless.

  • Thomas Watson

Great design will not sell an inferior product, but it will enable a great product to achieve its maximum potential.

  • Lee Iacocca

When the product is right, you don’t have to be a great Marketer.

  • Seth Godin

Don’t find customers for your products, find products for your customers.

  • David Ogilvy

Good products can be sold by honest advertising. If you don’t think the product is good, you have no business to be advertising it.

  • Zig Ziglar

If you believe your product or service can fulfill a true need, it’s your moral obligation to sell it.

  • Eleanor Roosevelt

Happiness is not a goal; it is a by-product.

  • W Edwards Deming

You cannot inspect quality into the product; it is already there.

  • Recep Tayyip Erdogan

According to this view, democracy is a product of western culture, and it cannot be applied to the Middle East which has a different cultural, religious, sociological and historical background.

  • Bob Geldof

Divorce is a by-product of the fact that maybe the nuclear unit is gone.

  • Alan Cumming

My feeling about work is it’s much more about the experience of doing is than the end product. Sometimes things that are really great and make lots of money are miserable to make, and vice versa.

  • Henry Ford

A market is never saturated with a good product, but it is very quickly saturated with a bad one.

  • Stephen Covey

I am not a product of my circumstances. I am a product of my decisions.

  • Calvin Klein

The only way to advertise is by not focusing on the product.

  • Miley Cyrus

I hate bring thought of as a product.

  • Estee Lauder

If you don’t sell, it’s not the product that’s wrong, it’s you.

  • Marissa Mayer

Product management really is the fusion between technology, what engineers do and the business side.

  • Philip Kotler

The sales department isn’t the whole company, but the whole company better be the sales department.

  • Gary Hamel

Alan Kay’s famous aphorism is that perspective is worth 80 IQ points. An innovative insight is not the product of an individual’s brilliance. It’s not as if innovators’ heads are wired in different ways. Innovation typically comes from looking at the world through a slightly different lens

  • Jack Welch

Shareholder value is a result, not a strategy … Your main constituencies are your employees, your customers and your products.

  • Lady Gaga

I already am a product

  • Ross Perot

Business is not just doing deals; business is having great products, doing great engineering, and providing tremendous service to customers. Finally, business is a cobweb of human relationships.

  • Jeff Bezos

I strongly believe that missionaries make better products. They care more. For a missionary, it’s not just about the business. There has to be a business, and the business has to make sense, but that’s not why you do it. You do it because you have something that motivates you.

  • Richard Branson

We experiment endlessly, with new products, new companies and new marketing. A successful business the emphasis is on experiment and development, ideas are the lifeblood of business.

  • Clayton M. Christensen

A disruptive innovation is a technologically simple innovation in the form of a product, service, or business model that takes root in a tier of the market that is unattractive to the established leaders in an industry.

  • Billy Joel

Have you listened to the radio lately? Have you heard the canned, frozen and processed product being dished up to the world as American popular music today?

  • Tom Ford

When you are having fun, and creating something you love, it shows in the product. So, when a woman is sifting through a rack of clothes, somehow that piece of clothing that you had so much fun designing speaks to her; she responds to it and buys it. I believe you can actually transfer that energy to material things as you’re creating them.

  • Donald Trump

Mitt – what I speak to Mitt Romney about is jobs. What I speak to Mitt Romney about is China, because he’s got a great view on China and how they’re trying to destroy our country by taking our jobs and making our product and manipulating their currency, so that it makes it almost impossible for our companies to compete.

  • Robert Kiyosaki

Most businesses think that product is the most important thing, but without great leadership, mission and a team that deliver results at a high level, even the best product won’t make a company successful.

  • Boone Pickens

I don’t go cheap on anything, but I’m not a shopper. If I want something, I look at it, decide what it is, but it will usually be the best product. I’ve got a pair of loafers that I still wear that I got in 1957.

  • Tm Cook

Price is rarely the most important thing. A cheap product might sell some units. Somebody gets it home and they feel great when they pay the money, but then they get it home and use it and the joy is gone.

  • Cary Grant

We have our factory, which is called a stage. We make a product, we color it, we title it and we ship it out in cans.

Easiest Way to Seal a Sales Deal

Easiest Way to Seal a Sales Deal

A sale is a process that takes one closer to the next step until you cross the line marked red. And that is when you complete a sale. Until then it is a dance between the prospect and the Sales Professional. So what are the steps involved in making the final sale? How does Sales Professional figure when to move on to the next step? Here we give you some commonly required steps that would ensure that you get a reasonably good chance of making the final sale.

Qualify your prospects

In sales, it is essential to moderate the customers because it can save you an enormous amount of time. Qualifying the prospects is best explained using the acronym ADD where A stands for Affordability, the first D stands for Desire, and the second D stands for Decision-maker. Regarding affordability, the question we need to ask is can this prospect afford our product. Secondly, does this prospect have enough desire and be motivated to buy our product. And finally, are we talking to the decision-maker or does somebody else make the decisions for the candidate on their behalf in which case we need to ensure that the concerned decision-maker attends the sales meeting.

Qualify your prospects

Entice through convincing

Once you have recognized the decision-maker and had an opportunity to lay down the basics, it is time to entice them with perks. These perks would make their decision-making that much easier. They are a free offering to go along with the final sale that is complementary to the product, absolutely easy payment terms, and a test sampling of the product. It may look like hand-holding the prospects, but that is precisely the objective. The onus is on the Professionals to convince them enough to make the sale.

Entice through convincing

Commitment in Action

Having made the prospects sample the product, the next thing to do is get them to take some action. The act serves as psychological commitment and is a clear indication that they are willing to possess the product. Willingness to own the product helps accelerate the sales process to a great extent.  Without writing down the desire to own the product, it is just a dream. When they have put it in black and white, in this case filling out and signing a form, it triggers off a chain of events that make the dream come to fruition.

Commitment in Action

Follow-up for payments

Payments are a crucial part of sales. People have a tendency to delay payments. Sales have a role to play in pushing the prospects to make payments as fast as possible. One way is to ask them to make a partial deposit to secure the booking. The other way is to make it easy for them to make the payments. Payment follow-up is like conveying a message. And for a message sent to be effective, it has to be transmitted at least three times in different formats – Conversation, Email, and Reminder.

Follow-up payments

Eliminate buyers remorse

The sale is not complete until the refund period expires. After the sale, there is a certain grace period within which time the customer is entitled to claim for a refund. It is because once the product is in the hands of the client, buyers’ remorse kicks in and they start doubting as to whether the purchase was necessary or not. Sales people should try and understand the reason behind the guilt and try to alleviate it. Invite them for cocktails, having a conversation or simply asking for referrals can do the trick.

Eliminate buyers' remorse

Early Guerrilla Marketing Tactics of Salesforce.com

Early Guerrilla Marketing Tactics of Salesforce.com

Salesforce.com employed guerrilla marketing tactics early on. Budding entrepreneurs all over the world have elegant and innovative ideas. However, they struggle with the obstacles they face in their journey to turn their business into a commercial success. Worse still, each one thinks that they are alone in their fights. However, every entrepreneur goes through the same pain points. The story of Salesforce.com provides some valuable lessons that start-ups can learn. Although they are practical, it requires a mindset that embraces a radical approach to doing business. It that departs sharply from the more traditional one. Study them carefully and customize it for your businesses.

Stand out with a purpose

In 2000, at the salesforce.com launch party in San Francisco at the Regency Theatre, what stood out was the theme about waging war against the traditional way of delivering software services. They turned the lowest level of the theater into an inferno with actors locked up inside cages playing captured and frustrated enterprise salespeople. They were screaming, “Help, get me out,” “Sign this million-dollar license agreement. I need to make my quota!” etc. After the more than fifteen hundred attendees had worked their way through this hell, they went to the top floor. The place represented heaven where there was music, light and finally salesforce.com. There they obtain Nirvana.

The End of Software Campaign was the name of the party. On the morning of that day at the Siebel User Group Conference at the Moscone Center Salesforce.com sent hired actors. Their job was to pretend to be TV crew from a local station. They also sent protestors to picket the conference. Every person who went into the meeting were given an invitation to the salesforce.com launch party that night. Although the police arrived immediately, their presence only fanned the flames as the protestors were there legally.

PR Week recognized this End of Software Campaign as the “Hi-Tech Campaign of the Year”. Within two weeks around one thousand organizations signed up for the service. By daring to be different than the conventional way salesforce.com was able to get the much-needed press coverage at nil cost and reach out to the target market which was the end-users rather than the business enterprises and large corporations.

Aim for potential end users

Salesforce’s City Tour Program built Street Teams that got customers selling for the company on a local level. Each City Tour stop had a keynote address. Marc Benioff, the founder of Salesforce.com, spoke at each event followed by a live demo. There was also some time dedicated for questions.

In every City, the customers were eager to share their stories about their experiences using the software. This City Tour frenzy morphed into a movement. Salesforce.com contacted end-users in advance of the events, and most were eager to participate. Salesforce.com started to post blown up pictures of their customers at events and other marketing materials. Their companies acknowledged these employees’ success since it contributed immensely to the bottom line and they climbed the corporate ladder faster than otherwise would have been possible. Ads started appearing on job sites and soon “implementing salesforce.com” became a differentiating skill that set the candidates apart. It became a skill that employers sought out highly in sales professionals.

Salesforce.com evolves through a process called “intelligent reaction” – a process that involves making minor upgrades every week and constant releases incorporating real-time feedback from the end-users. The phenomenon, as they put it, means going where the business takes them rather than predicting the future trends without any inputs from the customers. It is, in essence, engaging the end-user as an active participant in the evolution of the company. In their early growth, salesforce.com built an online community through forums, blogs and chat sessions that have been emulated by many other companies since then.

Vulture and not venture capital

Raising money at the initial stage of the business evolution was no easy task for salesforce.com. It was an uphill battle. During the frothy dot-com era, Salesforce turned to the venture capitalists (VC) with their cold pitch for investment. When VC after VC turned them down, they turned to the age-old adage of 3F – friends, family, and fools – in other words, vulture-capitalists to raise capital for their start-up. This alternative financing model turned out to be a winning funding strategy that brought the investors exceptional returns in a short time. Subsequently, it attracted a steady stream of potential investors within a very short period. And the VCs regretted their decision not to believe in the company.

The journey of Salesforce thus began with a purpose to do enterprise software differently. By taking advantage of the enormous opportunities of the Internet in an industry known as Cloud Computing that was growing leaps and bounds at that time, Salesforce.com was able to deliver enterprise applications cheaply through a website. It started off in 1999 in a small rented apartment with three developers and a few computers. Ten years later the company morphed into a $1 billion company with a few thousand employees. Salesforce not only managed to survive the dot-com crash of 2001 but also grew to become the world’s largest growing software company in less than a decade.

Lessons for startups

The End of Software type of launch party may not be a possible thing for every start-up company due to many restrictions. Friends and family may not believe in and invest in a concept that resides just in the head of an aspiring business person. But the implication is that by leveraging a guerilla tactic and bringing on board well-wishers an entrepreneur with a can-do-attitude can take the company to soaring heights. The idea is not to copy and paste the ideas illustrated here but to borrow ideas and adapt them with some modifications depending on the nature of the business, the local culture and the needs of the end-users. Uniqueness within the norm is of the essence here.

Photo Credit: Daria Nepriakhina

Developing Business and Managing Sales: It is a Nightmare

Developing Business and Managing Sales: It is a Nightmare

The vexing question of every Sales Manager and Business Development Manager who is newly appointed is this: “What am I supposed to do and not do”?

Managing sales and developing business at the same time can be a nightmare for a large organization. Each role is a humungous task in itself. Combining the both together and expecting one person to handle both is not only practically difficult but also inefficient. Small business owners may not agree to this as more often than not they have just one person who wears both these hats, and they find it cost-efficient too. That may work out initially for a start-up or a mom and pop store, but in the long run, when the business grows to attain maximum scalability the firm must segregate the two tasks and appoint a Sales Manager as well as a Business Development Manager to perform two different kinds of jobs. Often the difficulty in doing so arises because of the ambiguity in the roles played by both employees who hold different titles. Business owners and managers themselves are confused as to what they are supposed to do.

The roles that are unique to a Business Development Manager are the following:

  • Building the right product-market mix
  • Determining whether the product meets the need of the client
  • Expanding the reach of the goods to increase revenue
  • Recommending timely adjustments to products
  • Improving products to fill customer requirements
  • Informing clients about new developments in the products
  • Dealing with prospects unsatisfied with the products
  • Responding to negative press about the products
  • Pitching goods and services in new market segments
  • Studying the competitive landscape in the industry
  • Forming strategic partnerships with other businesses
  • Segmenting the target customer market
  • Prioritizing market segments or key accounts
  • Identifying various routes to market
  • Creating strategies to expand company’s current markets
  • Researching markets to find new ones
  • Planning and overseeing new market initiatives
  • Attending conferences, meetings, and industry events
  • Researching companies to hunt leads
  • Exploring, prospecting, and qualifying leads
  • Researching who makes decisions about purchasing
  • Determining whether a lead is ready to buy
  • Bringing in enough qualified leads to generate business
  • Attracting customers to the front door of the building
  • Maintaining fruitful relationships with existing customers
  • Contacting potential customers to establish rapport
  • Investigating if the price matches the ideal buyer’s affordability
  • Negotiating prices with manufacturers and distributors
  • Developing quotes and proposals to new partners
  • Identifying new opportunities and methods for sales campaigns
  • Generating demand and maximizing sales
  • Writing reports and providing feedback to upper management
  • Creating high-level vision and developing relevant strategies
  • Understanding the fundamental drivers of the business
  • Making wise decisions in pursuit of long-term value
  • Determining when and where to scale the business
  • Gathering data to validate paths to achieve business goals
  • Identifying and executing new areas of business
  • Weighing how changes affect the entire company
  • Identifying signals that promise greater opportunity
  • Assessing trade-offs between opportunities vs. risks
  • Generating new channels to reach customers
  • Producing long-term growth and profitability
  • Planning operations and strategic marketing with top executives
  • Coordinating with departments for new account setups

The roles that are explicit to a Sales Manager are the following:

  • Demonstrating the product features
  • Overseeing the distribution of products
  • Maintaining appropriate inventory levels
  • Gauging customer’s product preferences
  • Monitoring market trends to tweak sales efforts
  • Weighing how changes affect sales territories
  • Taking deals across the finish lines
  • Selling the product to the identified customer
  • Convincing customer to go from the door to cash register
  • Up-selling and cross-selling to existing clients
  • Offering post-purchase service and support
  • Resolving customer complaints regarding sales and service
  • Optimizing existing channel to reach more customers
  • Selling to customers in new territories
  • Explaining price breakdowns to prospective customers
  • Informing payment terms to end-users
  • Developing pricing schedules and rates
  • Developing promotional ideas and materials
  • Determining discounts and special pricing plans
  • Tracking sales team metrics and reporting to leadership
  • Implementing sales plans based on company policies
  • Developing sales strategy to achieve organizational goals
  • Preparing and approving budgets and expenditures
  • Coordinating and monitoring online sales activities
  • Meeting business revenue targets
  • Focusing exclusively on driving revenue
  • Following up on business leads on a regular basis
  • Investigating lost sales and customer accounts
  • Tracking, interpreting and collating sales figures
  • Maintaining data and records for future reference
  • Formulating sales policies and procedures
  • Executing and measuring sales plan
  • Hiring, training and leading sales professionals
  • Managing team of sales staff and assign territories
  • Developing field sales action plans
  • Collaborating with IT to improve the sales technology
  • Developing direct sales techniques for the sales force
  • Creating incentives for representatives
  • Generating ideas for sales motivational initiatives
  • Executing measures when performance deviates
  • Advising representatives on ways to improve performance
  • Demonstrating excellent team-building skills
  • Transforming sales team into a high-performing one
  • Determining ways to streamline and improve the sales process
  • Keeping up to date with products and competitors

Business Development Manager is responsible for creating long-term value for the business while a Sales Manager is supposed to maximize sales. A good analogy is thus: A Business Development Manager gets the customer to the door, and a Sales Manager takes the customer from the door to the cash register. A Business Development Manager who is busy looking over the competitive landscape to spot trends and opportunities does not have time to service the clients. It is the job of the Sales Manager to take care of the prospect. Hence the separation between the two roles.
Photo Credit: Olu Eletu

BENEFITS, NOT FEATURES: 30 QUOTES FROM FAMOUS PEOPLE

BENEFITS, NOT FEATURES: 30 QUOTES FROM FAMOUS PEOPLE

BENEFITS, NOT FEATURES: 30 QUOTES

  • Reid Hoffman: Founder, LinkedIn

If you are not embarrassed by the first version of your product, you’ve launched too late.

  • Tim Cook

A great product isn’t just a collection of features. It’s how it all works together.

  • Marco Arment: Founder, Instapaper

Making a product better often requires removing features.

  • Kathy Sierra

The secret to building great products is not creating awesome features, it’s to make users awesome.

  • Jay Abraham

Sell the benefits, not your company or the product. People buy results, not features.

  • Dave McClure: Founder, 500 Startups

Features are like having sex. You make one mistake and you have to support it for life.

  • Paul Buchheit

Pick three key attributes or features, get those things very, very right, and then forget about everything else … By focusing on only a few core features in the first version, you are forced to find the true essence and value of the product.

  • John Wesley

Our old system was just not able to accommodate our newest product features. Our goal was to get a stable, scalable, system that would help us speed new products to market.

  • Kevin Systrom

The best feature is less featureless.

  • Douglas Crockford

We see a lot of feature-driven product design in which the cost of features is not properly accounted. Features can have a negative value to customers because they make the products more difficult to understand and use. We are finding that people like products that just work. It turns out that designs that just work are much harder to produce that designs that assemble long list of features.

  • Eric Ries

I would say, as an entrepreneur everything you do – every action you take in product development, marketing, every conversation you have, everything you do – is an experiment. If you can conceptualize your work not as building features, not as launching campaigns, but as running experiments, you can get radically more done with less effort.

  • Steve Blank

We now know that something between 85 and 90 percent of most software product features are unwanted and unneeded by customers. That is an enormous amount of waste of time and money that ends up on the floor.

  • Sergey Brin

We are focused on features, not products. We eliminated future products that would have made the complexity problem worse. We don’t want to have 20 different products that work in 20 different ways. I was getting lost at our site keeping track of everything. I would rather have a smaller set of products that have a shared set of features.

  • Jakob Nielsen

Even the best designers produce successful products only if their designs solve the right problems. A wonderful interface to the wrong features will fail.

  • Cindy Alvarez

What features your customers as for is never as interesting as why they want them.

  • Alan Cooper

Reducing a product’s definition to a list of features and functions ignores the real opportunity – orchestrating technological capability to serve human needs and goals.

  • Jefferson Han

If you watched companies such as Sony and Samsung grow, they focused first on features and then on industrial design, which made their products look and feel better.

  • Tony Fadell

No amount of data will tell you if a feature should be in the product, because it doesn’t exist. You need to have a very clear leader with a clear point of view…otherwise, you get a mishmash of features and stuff that doesn’t make a lot of sense.

  • Ram Shriram

You want to do a few things really well because you want to come out with a product that is fully baked, even though it may be lacking in a few features or whatever, rather than the one that’s all-achieving but not doing anything too well.

  • Gregory Benford

It turns out that if you optimize the performance of a car and of an airplane, they are very far away in terms of mechanical features. So you can make a flying car. But they are not very good planes, and they are not very good planes.

  • Scott Adams

Normal people…believe that if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Engineers believe that if it ain’t broke, it doesn’t have enough features yet.

  • James Surowiecki

Technology is supposed to make our lives easier, allowing us to do things more quickly and efficiently. But too often it seems to make things harder, leaving us with fifty-button remote controls, digital cameras with hundreds of mysterious features and book-length manuals, and cars with dashboard systems worthy of the space shuttle.

  • John Carmack

The cost of adding a feature isn’t just the time it takes to code it. The cost also includes the addition of an obstacle to future expansion. The trick is to pick the features that don’t fight each other.

  • Jeffrey Gitomer

I don’t want features, I want value. I don’t want benefits, I want value.

  • David Karp

Every feature has some maintenance cost, and having fewer features lets us focus on the ones we care about and make sure they work very well.

  • Stephen Baker

Prices are coming down. And they have the features and benefits people want.

  • Tim Locke

Hardwood floors are very popular features in new homes. Many individuals are also installing hardwood floors when they renovate their residences. Consumers realize that this feature adds value to their investment.

  • Emmett Shear

This is true for most new products. The majority of people you’re competing with are non-users. They are people who have never used your service before. And what they say is actually the most important. What they say is the thing that blocks you from expanding the size of your market with your features.

  • Carl Sagan

The fossil record implies trial and error, the inability to anticipate the future, features inconsistent with a Great Designer.

  • Leah Culver

Learn not to add too many features right away, and get the core idea built and tested.

Image: Imani Clovis