Your Job is to Hurdle the Top 3 Sales Objections

Your Job is to Hurdle the Top 3 Sales Objections

Your Job is to Hurdle the Top 3 Sales Objections

Sales objections are the bane of existence for many salespeople. Here are a few tips to leap the hurdles and tackle the top 3 sales objections.

Sales Objection #1: Your price is too high

  • Which means?
  • Compared to what?
  • How much did you think it would cost?
  • It is high compared to what some companies charge. However, we sell over 800 units a month. Why do you think that is? Do you think that these 800 businesspeople would buy from us if they didn’t see the superior quality and the value they receive?
  • It costs only about 48 cents per hour of operation. That’s less than a can of Coke out of a vending machine. You can afford that, can’t you?
  • What neighborhood do you live in? That’s a nice neighborhood. You are obviously a person who appreciates the finer things in life. Why are you denying yourself top quality now? Does that make sense?
  • Why do you think our competitors are cheaper? Where do you think that they cut the corners? Did they use cheaper materials? Poorly trained craftsmen? Did they cut back on quality control? Why worry about where they cut corners? Why not buy the best and sleep well at night!

Sales Objection #2: I’m too busy; talk to our Purchasing Manager first.

  • (Prospect’s name), suppose you receive a letter marked “Personal and Confidential.” Would you allow your Purchasing Manager to open it? (Wait for a reply.) The proposal I have was intended for your eyes only. What I have to say is too important to be shared with anyone outside the executive suite. Can we talk now?
  • I appreciate how busy you are. However, the opportunity I have to share with you will have a significant impact upon the future of your company. All I ask for is a brief moment to explain the dollar consequences of this important proposal. Isn’t this worth a few minutes of your time?
  • Does he have the authority to approve a $_______ purchase? (If the prospect says yes:) Thank you, I’ll be sure to remind him/her and I’ll see him/her right now. (If the prospect says no:) Well, then, why should I talk with him/her?
  • Our proposal is really very significant. It requires detailed information from top management. Is ____ privy to all details and operating plans known to top management? If not, we should set aside five minutes to cover the key parts of this opportunity together. After that, if you want me, I will be happy to talk with ____
  • Are you too busy to save money?
  • If this opportunity save your company, $____, who do you want to be the hero, you or the Purchasing Manager?
  • We almost never deal with Purchasing Managers. This is an executive-level decision. I need to talk with you.
  • I am sure your Purchasing Manager is very competent. However, I can assure you, this information is beyond his/her realm of expertise. This information is for the person who is in charge of the total bottom-line profitability of the company.
  • I cannot talk with Purchasing Managers. It is company policy. I will either talk with you, or no one in your company will learn of this opportunity. Can we talk?
  • You want me to talk with your Purchasing Manager? I know what you are really saying is that you don’t think this opportunity is worthy of your attention. May I have two minutes to explain to you why it is?
  • You want me to talk with someone else? Why do you think I called you? It wasn’t by chance! The information I have is for you only! After you have heard it, if you want me to talk with ____, I will be happy to. But, I am confident it won’t be necessary.
  • How do you feel when you call someone and they ask you to speak with someone else? Well, that’s the way I fell now! What would you do if you were in my position?
  • Thank you for your suggestion. The news I have is very important. Why don’t you give him/her my name and number, and have him/her call me? I don’t normally talk with Purchasing Managers. I’d really prefer to talk with you. May I have a few minutes of your time?
  • I have already talked with your Purchasing Manager. He said it was very important that you and I talk directly.
  • By handing me over to your Purchasing Manager, what you are really telling me is that you don’t know how critical this matter really is. Would you like to learn why?

Sales Objection #3: I want to work with a more established company

  • You impress me as a very smart businessperson. I know you haven’t invited me here to chat about the weather. You don’t want to put all your eggs in one basket, do you?
  • I understand how safe you feel about a relationship that goes back 15 years. And yet, I saw your eyes light up when you looked at our products. I can see that you’re giving serious consideration to diversity. Just out of curiosity, could we compare the pros and cons of the two choices? Let’s take a piece of paper and list the reasons for and buying from us. The first reason against us is that we haven’t worked with you for the past 15 years. What would be the reasons for giving us a chance to prove ourselves?
  • Is there anything about me that prevents you from doing business with our company?
  • I can say good things about my competitor and if I were you, I would go with them – unless, of course, you want a better product at a better price.
  • I do respect your loyalty to your present vendor. Loyalty is a virtue. While we’re on the subject, how about your loyalty to your company’s long-term profits? Isn’t that kind of loyalty just as important as loyalty to an outside vendor? If I could show you a way of improving your company’s profits, would you take a serious look at our products?

(Adapted from the book “Sales Scripts That Close Every Deal” by Gerhard Gschwandtner, Founder and Publisher of Selling Power)

Photo: Alberto Guimaraes

Warning Signs in Sales

Warning Signs in Sales

Warning Signs in Sales

The cavemen used signs as communication tools when there were no other means to pass on messages. As time went by, signs have lost its significance and now we use languages instead. With the evolution of language, people have lost the ability to read signals even when signs convey rich meaning. Tribal people who have stubbornly refused to integrate into the civilized world still use signs to communicate to others.

To a caveman, signals may be a powerful means of communication. But in today’s sales parlance it is a cue that conveys information that is unobservable from a sender to recipient. Sales management is all about signaling that ultimately leads to increased revenue. Managers design campaigns through the filter of signaling, a process of sending messages with the objective of influencing purchasing behaviors. Done correctly, this can lead to the desired amount of transactional sales. On the downside, market perception may turn out to be unfavorable.

A signal can mean different things to different users (Spence, 1974). When sales executives use signaling, test the waters by experimenting it with a smaller subset of the market. This will enable them to contain rapidly any undesirable consequences and thus manage it appropriately.

When not to use signaling

However, at times, there are costs involved in marketing signaling. It may result in product line cannibalization whereby customers wait for the signaled action and delay purchasing the existing product. Or circumstances beyond the sender’s control may affect the timely delivery of preannounced product or features of it as promised. Similarly, a price cut could be the result of excess inventory or product elimination. So, it would be in the best interest of all to not engage in price war that would dilute profit.

Sign language used by companies

Price signaling raised turbine generator profit/sales ratios in the 1950s. In 1992 Ford announced a 6% price increase to signal not to start a costly war for market share.

Service firms

Firms that sell intangible products may indicate their high value through prestigious addresses, fancy club memberships, office décor, etc. Some companies hint to the customers their willingness to work around customer needs. They do it through differential pricing, increasing staff count for peak times and by providing complimentary services.

Airlines

Airlines are notorious for undercutting fares on those routes that are lucrative to their competitors in a bid to undermine the best efforts of their rivals. In such cases, if the undercutting of fares is done to put a spanner in the works then the rates are brought up to the normal level as soon as the objective has been achieved even before some of the travel agents have found out.

Stockmarket

Firms pay dividends to its shareholders as a sign of strength signaling to the market that there is no need to hoard cash. Some investors look for a company’s Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives to gauge the health of the enterprise. Such companies use CSR to signal the appropriate messages.

Restaurants

Restaurants open up in an up-market locale with high rents to signal to the patrons of its five-star status as well as to advertise its good food. Warranties and guarantees are other examples marketers use to show the credibility of the quality of the product. They offer insurance against faulty products to potential buyers. Longer the warranty, higher the quality.

Marketing signaling is also messages sent to other companies within the industry either to convey to or to gain information from competitors. Companies selectively leak information to manipulate the opponent’s choice of actions. Employees find press announcements to be more credible than internal communications.

Types of signaling

Kirmani and Rao (2000) distinguishes between two types of signaling based on the financial consequences. They are:

  • Default-independent signals, where companies incur financial loss, such as heavy advertising costs or fixed upfront costs, whether the signals default on their claims or not.
  • Default-contingent signals where companies suffer monetary loss only when the signals default on their claims, for instance, when a high price signal matches with equally high quality.

Keys to signaling success

Maintaining a consistency throughout the organization as to the meaning of the signals is crucial to the success of signaling marketing. Once a signaling strategy has been decided by the company executives the information must be passed on to every employee from top to bottom. Failure to do so may not only cause inconsistency in the quality level but also mar the reputation and integrity of the brand. Equally important is how the rival companies interpret the meaning of signaling.

Also, as responsible marketers, it is rather important to examine your conscience before indulging in signal marketing as using it to promote transactional sales at the detriment of brand integrity is unethical and immoral. In light of this, signaling management has become a tricky task of business leaders. The correct interpretation of sales signals enable the executives to brace themselves to avoid any potential threat or to position them to take advantage of the opportunity.

Having said that, with signaling marketing it is still hard to predict the response of the target audience. Neither is it easy to gauge the perception in the minds of the recipients. Moreover, the way one party perceives the meaning of signals may not be the way another party views them. And that is why it is advisable and a prudent strategy to test the signal response on a smaller scale in an area that closely resembles the target market.

Photo Credit: Bart Anestin

Kickstart Your Start-up by Capitalizing on Weaknesses of Multinationals

Kickstart Your Start-up by Capitalizing on Weaknesses of Multinationals

Kickstart Your Start-up by Capitalizing on Weaknesses of Multinationals

Start-ups become fat by converting the weaknesses of multinationals into their strengths

Big firms seem to have it all. Audacious business plans that seem to span a lifetime. Intimidating logos that have withstood the test of time. And brand strategy that tells stories like fairy tales. Moreover, they have been in the business for decades. This has enabled them to amass the expertise necessary to withstand any political upheavals, economic uncertainties, and social changes. These pioneers have managed to go through the experience curve.

However, in recent years, entrepreneurial firms have also sprung up like mushrooms despite some setbacks. More often they set their wheels in motion without much planning or strategy. Although market forces have compelled them to do so for future sustenance. They did not have the political, economic or social clout that the giant behemoths claim. They still managed to become successful companies in their earnest desire to satisfy a market need in their respective fields. How did they do it?

What are the competitive advantages of big firms?

Many large corporations and multinational conglomerates consolidate their production processes to cut costs and to centralize their decision-making structure. The economic and trade policies of several governments make it easier for those companies to do so. It gives them a huge advantage. They are able to cut costs. They are able to borrow from the expertise and resources of the geographical area where they base their production activities. For instance, they take advantage of the cheap labor or tax systems, and sometimes even the weather conditions for certain products. They win the favor of labor unions and local communities in which they reside since they create jobs and stimulate the economy. And they seem to have very cozy and symbiotic relationships with peripheral businesses within the industry.

Another advantage multinational companies have is deep pockets that enable them to produce flashy television advertisements during high-profile international events such as Olympics and in popular venues backed by celebrities. Such marketing gimmicks are unrivaled and smaller firms cannot match them because of the high price advertisers demand. Such advertisements have a wider appeal, and at the end of the day, it’s a numbers game.

The social and business network that large consumer packaged goods (CPG) companies have gained due to being in the business market for a very extended period gives them access for prominent placements on shelves. In the cases of large service firms, this gives them the enviable position to gain access to huge conglomerates through providing consultancy support. If nothing, public perception favors big company brands.

What are the weaknesses of start-ups?

Start-ups on the other hand, by them being in the infancy stage, unfortunately, do not have many of the power and privileges that big businesses have. Mostly people who have either failed in the job market or out of stark economic necessity found a company which implies less financial resources. Often they are at the disposal of friends, families or fools to lend them money to scale their business operations. Although venture capitalists and angel investors have risen in recent years, the brutal bureaucratic procedures involved in getting to pitch in front of such capitalists deter many start-up entrepreneurs to abandon their efforts at a very early stage of the process.

What is then left for them to do, is to start from the grassroots level that entails knocking on the doors of prospective customers. It takes an enormous amount of motivation, ambition, and drive which are rare commodities in this age of instant gratification because the efforts take a long time to yield results, if at all. Sometimes the lukewarm response from the market can take a toll on the individual and can sap the energy level. It can lead to frustration, disenchantment and a lack of self-worth.

Hope – yes we can!

Hope is at hand. Think about the risks involved in consolidated manufacturing enjoyed by many multinational companies. In most cases, the companies have a stake in the real estate of the production system – land, factories, and capital-intensive machinery. They are vulnerable to single currency swings as well as the economic chaos that may ensue after that. Start-up companies who are smart enough outsource their production of goods and services. Any pitfalls then will be borne by the companies who own the production infrastructure. In other words, start-ups get to make hay while the sun shines and can quickly withdraw when times are rough.

Thanks to the time we live in, the Internet has made it possible for start-ups to reach out to an equal number of people using social media and digital marketing in the comfort of their dens or basements that they use to start their businesses. Hence they do not have to resort to the flashy television advertisements.

Online distribution network companies such as Amazon works as a perfect substitute to prominent shelf placement for start-up companies. It has enormous potential for entrepreneurial firms for secure delivery as well as to scale their operations to the magnitude of that of multinationals if done right.

Take a piggy-back ride

Outsourcing the production processes as well as online marketing and distribution can all be done with a fraction of the cost sometimes even free of charge. For example, the success of content marketing relies predominantly on the quality of the content. If one looks around one can find hundreds of tools and tactics that is being made possible in this day and age for a start-up company to grow and make money. So the moral of the story is to take a piggy-back ride on the times we are!

Additionally, in most industries barriers to entry are falling making it irresistible for an entrepreneur. The Internet gives us real-time information about the market thereby making start-ups more attuned to the needs of the market. What all these factors do for a start-up is give them much-needed agility, dexterity, and nimbleness in the decision-making.

Photo: Verne Ho

Relationship Selling is like Selecting a Life Partner

Relationship Selling is like Selecting a Life Partner

There is an old saying in the sales community that if you can’t sell yourself, you won’t be able to sell anything else. I see this happen in every salesperson’s life when they use their relationship selling skills in personal day to day life. Any long term project in sales needs the same amount of patience as required in selecting a life partner. This theory is easily understood if the sales process is applied to selecting a life partner as seen in the following process of selling to a new  mining project.

Objective

In both cases (whether it be applied to relationship selling or selecting a life partner) you have a clear objective in mind. The objective in sales for a new mining project is to sell your products and solutions to new green field mining job and in the second case is to select a suitable life partner.

Identifying

This is a critical first step in either mining sales or selecting a life partner. Identifying a mining project starts with networking and seeking geologists that inform you which project sites are under evaluation. Another form of seeking a new mining project is through different media channels, such as TV and newspaper. On the other hand, when you start searching for a life partner, your friends play the role of the “geologists” by introducing you to possible partners. Also, media channels such as social media and dating websites are used to search for the perfect partner.

Prospecting

Once you identify a new mining job, you start prospecting by finding who is the owner, EPC (Engineering, Procurement, and Construction) and financiers for that job. Similarly, in the case of a life partner, you start gathering data about his/her personality, parents, friends, family friends and professional life. In both cases, you normally stop chasing either the project or the person at this point if it is not the right fit for you.

Presenting

This is the point where you use all your sales skills. You start working with all stakeholders in the mining project who you identified at the time of prospecting. You discuss their needs, present your products and solutions, show them your references and finally discuss financials. Similarly, in the other scenario, you mutually understand each other, present yourself to each other’s family, introduce your family and friends and discuss your financial standings.

Knowing your competitors

This is the most important step in both scenarios. In mining sales, you always want to be aware of your competitors. Any kind of relationship (any applicable past contract) the company is having with any competitors which can affect this project. Similarly, in other case, you also want to know from your future life partner about their present commitment level and make sure that they are not interested in someone else.

Finalizing

After you’ve finished handling all objections in the mining job, you finalize the deal and get an order through a negotiation. Also, in the case of looking for a life partner, you mutually decide about the marriage date, expenses, size and perhaps the value of the ring, etc. The time taken in winning a mining project can take a number of years or sometimes the project becomes dead at any step. Similarly, in the other scenario, it also takes times and in some cases a relationship doesn’t achieve soul mate status.

Handling situations

A good relationship selling sales person never gets depressed in the initial stages, as he is always working on multiple opportunities; but, in the other scenario, it all depends on each individual whether he is working with others before completing the prospecting stage.

Relationship selling is fun and you use sales in almost all aspects of your life. The only difference in the scenarios is that you stop prospecting in real life after you select a life partner unless the deal goes bad after a few months or years, but in mining sales, you are always working on new sales.

Photo: Yoann Boyer

Sanjeev Neb, CME, CSE, Sales Account Manager- Siemens Canada, Director-Sales and Marketing Executives International Inc. (SMEI)

Dare to be Edgy for Profitable Growth

Dare to be Edgy for Profitable Growth

Dare to be Edgy for Profitable Growth

Companies looking over the competitive landscape and moving away from the arena where their rivals squabble find profitable growth. Reinventing thus a business with bold and visionary thinking comes with huge risks as well as rewards. On the other hand, some companies have a tendency to over-rely on their core business. It can lead them to a blind spot where they miss growth opportunities. Sometimes for success, we need cautious and incremental changes. In other words, an in-between strategy that is neither a disruptive innovation nor a radical transformation.

Alan Lewis and Dan MacKone articulates such a mindset through their “Edge Strategy”. The book by the same name is based on a three-year research of innovation strategies of 585 international brands. It advocates three ways in which businesses can profit by looking for opportunities that lie hiding in plain sight. It involves rethinking the edges of your company that has proven to deliver 15% higher returns.

Accessorize your product

Understanding what your core business is essential for profitable growth. Equally important is discerning what features would augment the product. Alter the elements of a core offering that would appeal to the target market. Stretching the merchandise may appeal to the target market that can lead to revolutionary results. One way is to offer value-added services to your product by way of add-ons and upgrades. Another is to include service options with the core product being offered. Also, price it correctly so that people would be willing to pay for it.

JetBlue was on the brink of collapse a few years ago due to operational failure. They toyed with the idea of mergers, alliances and code shares that are practiced by some international carriers. A thorough analysis helped them realize that their market consisted of value-added travellers. They decided to apply the product edge strategy. The company managed to revive its business and stay in the market. They reduced the fare of the core product drastically and introduced paid accessories and add-ons such as extra legroom options and additional charge for a preferred seat. Passengers were willing to pay for that extra convenience and comfort for a pleasurable air travel. It generated more than $75 million in incremental profit. All because JetBlue accessorized their core product with bells and whistles.

Smoothen the customer journey

Time to time it is imperative for company officials to walk in the customers’ shoes. Their missions differ at every step of their decision-making journey. Look out for these pain points throughout the journey the customer takes in the process right from the awareness of the product until the purchase and even post-purchase. Try to support this trip by alleviating the pain points in an innovative way. Information-sharing and educating them on how to relieve pain is an excellent way to walk them through the voyage.

Greengrocer is a case in point. Over time they have realized that customers are not only looking to buy green vegetables but they also want them washed, cleaned, chopped and even ready to be prepared. The beauty of it is that customers are willing to pay the marginal price in exchange for the convenience it offers. Whole Foods went a few steps further by offering shoppers different food stations such as pizza ovens, salad bars, and home-prepared meals and even appealing seating arrangements that they claim now on an average generates one-fifth of their total revenue. And shoppers never seemed to complain when the mundane weekly grocery purchasing turns to lifestyle family experience. Thus Whole Foods have smoothened the customer’s journey every step of the way in an impressive and innovative manner for profitable growth.

Leverage enterprise resources

Make an inventory of all the business assets. Find new ways to unlock value through putting to use the company’s under-utilized assets or untapped resources so as to create a new revenue stream that would generate more income. Industry pioneers routinely sell their valuable expertise to the outside firms while still staying in business. By exploiting such possessions and using them in different contexts, companies have diversified and have amassed vast sources of revenue.

Amazon rents out its web services, its technological infrastructure, to third parties since the company realized that it would add value to other businesses. By doing so, Amazon built added a sustainable cloud computing business to its core product and enhanced its profitable growth. The competencies it had at its disposal was valuable enough for which they could command a good price. A critical assessment of their asset inventory enabled Amazon to recognize the potential of one of its untapped opportunity, and they capitalized on it. When company resources are being put to use in different context wealth is created and not destroyed. It does not have to be at the expense of disruptive innovation or blue ocean strategy but in tandem with them. And it adds to the bottom line of the company by way of generating additional revenue.

Leverage the periphery

The authors of “Edge Strategy” reckon that pursuing any one or all of the above strategies can lead to a myriad of opportunities for extra sources of income from which companies can choose depending on the profitable growth potential and feasibility of implementation. Think harder about the periphery or the “edges” of existing businesses.

The strategy is not new. However, very too often when thinking about company growth business executives are obsessed about pursuing industry disruption or inventing the wheels that come at a huge cost. Instead, look under your noses, and you will find several opportunities to earn extra income by making incremental changes to the existing businesses. Or they stay too focused on their core offering that they miss out on the changing trends thus rendering their products obsolete and redundant. Adopting an Edge Strategy® not only unearths inherent capabilities to create wealth but can also be rapidly implemented because it is a low-hanging fruit.

Photo: Greg Rakozy

Promote Your Brand Facebook Live

Promote Your Brand Facebook Live

Live video streaming is critical to brand growth in 2016 and it has really taken off this year in part due to the launch of Facebook Live. Live videos are real time video posts on Facebook and they can be a great way to promote and boost your brand. You can use them to communicate brand stories, to enhance relationships and to share your knowledge and expertise.

People love watching video and Facebook Live lets you connect directly with your friends and followers and to get more interactive with a younger demographic.

Right now the easiest way to broadcast on Facebook Live is using your iOS or Android device from your Facebook page, profile, or group you manage. You can also use your desktop but that’s a little more complex.

How To Use Facebook Live Video14425479_10155239402623662_4259300246151475752_o

To go Live simply login to Facebook, go to your page and click the publish icon as if you were going to publish a post. From there you click on the red video icon. As you complete this process a couple of pop ups will show up asking you to authorize the app to use the camera and microphone on your device. When you are ready to go live then click on the blue go live button!

Getting Ready to Share Your First Facebook Live Stream

There are a few key things to think about first though:

  • Promoting your Live event – tell people in advance that you will be going live. You can use your timelines, other social feeds and Facebook events to do this. Give them plenty of time to put it in their schedule.
  • Get ready – prepare your outline and presentation in advance so you know what you will be talking about. Facebook live should seem spontaneous and natural, but that doesn’t mean it should be completely unscripted. Set up your location too. Choose a quiet spot with little background traffic.
  • Make sure you have a good connection – video takes up a lot of bandwidth.

When to go Live on Facebook

What time you go Live will depend on your audience. Noon till 3pm is the best time to catch people at work and 6-9pm is optimum otherwise. It’s a great idea to coordinate with a popular event (industry conference) and tap into their event too (as long as you have a good connection there!).

After you are finished, your video is published as a post on your timeline so it is available for those who missed it to watch it later. Your video should be at least 10 minutes long. Broadcasts can last up to 90 minutes.

Below there’s a link to our first SMEI Facebook live event by Gregg Frederick, CSE, principal of G3 Development Group. Gregg used Facebook Live to explain how to use this powerful new social media tool to create engagement around both your personal and business brand.

What’s next with live video, YouTube live is now emerging too so make sure that’s part of your brand strategy for 2017.

Watch our first SMEI Facebook Live video on our Facebook feed.

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