SMEI Launches New Business Book Club for Members

SMEI Launches New Business Book Club for Members

SMEI announced today that a new business book club has been launched for SMEI Executive level members. Members are invited to read the monthly business book club selection and join in an online live webcam event to discuss the book.

One of the key attributes of successful leaders is their habit of reading business books. This forum is designed to bring the reading to life within the network of Executive members. Each member will have the opportunity to rate the monthly book selection on the following qualities on a scale of 1 – 5 stars and justify their ratings:

  • Mind teasing
  • Applicable
  • Recommendable
  • After taste

The first monthly book club will take place live online on March 26, 2018. The monthly featured book will be Entrepreneurial You: Monetize Your Expertise, Create Multiple Income Streams, and Thrive by Dorie Clark.

“We’re really excited about this new member benefit for our Executive level members,” said Willis Turner, CEO of SMEI. “Our first live event will be moderated by Ben Mastboom, CSE. Ben has a great skill in leading forums and we are pleased that he is able to join us for this program.”

For more information on registering for this event as an Executive Member, please visit the SMEI website.

If you are not yet a member and would like to join for this benefit and more, please visit SMEI’s membership options here.

 

Achieving Peak Performance Through Effective Goal Setting

Achieving Peak Performance Through Effective Goal Setting

Research shows that goals that are written are 80% more likely to be accomplished. Before we can set effective goals that are meaningful and motivating, we need to be in the proper mindset.

A peak performance mindset begins with changing your limiting beliefs into liberating beliefs. Research shows that 80% of our success comes from our mindset and 20% from our skills. Given that statistic, it is imperative that we understand some of the hurdles that stand in our way of that success.  The National Science Foundation has found that we have 60,000 thoughts each day, with 48,000 of them being negative. So, the negative mindset is paralyzing our ability to reach our goals day in and day out.

The question is, how do we overcome these negative thoughts to break through and reach our goals?   Author, Shawn Achor, outlines in his book, Before Happiness, that people with a happy mindset are 23% more energetic, 31% more productive, 300% more creative and sell 38% more!  For those of us who are in sales, and we all are in some way, this is great news.

In addition to finding ways to get into a happy mindset, we need to get into a growth mindset.  Dr. Carol Dweck, the leading authority on growth mindset, “the only thing that separates people who succeed from those who don’t is whether or not they have a growth mindset.” Therefore, you don’t want to get stuck in a rigid and repetitive mindset that keeps inhibiting your potential for success.  Those with a growth mindset are typically open to learning, embrace challenges, see efforts as a way to success and persist in the face of adversity, all of which are essential to reaching peak performance goals.

Since “goals are the pathway to your destination,” there are four steps to goal achievement.

  1. Visualize your goals. When you can visualize your goals, with a wall of dreams or vision board, your ability to define and reach those goals becomes infinitely more achievable.
  2. Write down your goals! – Goals that are written are 97% more achievable!
  3. Reflect \ After Action Report – Reflection, especially with a coach or mentor, is key in setting effective goals. Reflecting on why you are achieving allows you to understand the steps taken to achieve, while also reflecting on the reasons why you failed to achieve is key in learning the why behind the actions that lead to coming up short. In the business setting, you can use After Action Reports to reflect on the successes and failures in your business goals.
  4. Define the purpose for your goals. “The bigger the why the bigger the try.”  I usually recommend a personal brand statement, a family motto, or what you would want written on your tombstone.  As a proud husband and father of three boys, my personal purpose statement is “thank you, you showed us how to have fun, live life, love unconditionally and be respectful.”  For my business, G3 Development Group’s purpose is “planting seeds of emergence” in every customer interaction we have.  Meaning, everything we work on together will continue to emerge and bring value in time.

Finally, in the goal setting worksheet that I can send to you (emerge@g3developmentgroup.com), there is a space for you to list your talents (Gallup Strengthsfinder), so that you are always becoming the best version of yourself, there’s a place to paste your vision board, and there is a signature box.  Since everything that has serious consequences in life requires a signature, your goals should also. This is your way of taking ownership to your goal!

So wake up tomorrow, smile, embrace the challenges ahead of you with enthusiasm and reap the benefits of success!  You’ve got this!

For more information on how to achieve success visit our website.

Photo by Jungwoo Hong on Unsplash

What Does “Starbucks” Mean to Howard Schultz?

What Does “Starbucks” Mean to Howard Schultz?

Starbucks has almost become a synonym of coffee. Howard Schultz not only built an admirable company but also paved the ground for coffee culture inspired by timeless values. Each alphabet of the word STARBUCKS mean a great deal to Howard Schultz, the visionary entrepreneur, who built the organization from scratch. Through his Successful book “Onward” and in the Spirit of sharing Knowledge he tells us a Unique story of Coffee Brand in his own words involving Tenacity, Resilience, and Accomplishment.

S – Success

  • If not checked, success has a way of covering up small failures, and when many of us at Starbucks became swept up in the company’s success, it had unintended effects. We ignored, or maybe we just failed to notice, shortcomings.

T – Tenacity

  • I believed that Starbucks had an enormous potential to return to greatness, that the company had yet to be as good as it was going to be. I believed in the power of the brand, in our founding mission, and most of all, in our people.

A – Accomplishment

  • I’ve come to think that I am at my best as a leader when Starbucks is being challenged or fighting for survival. I’m comfortable with, and in a way, enjoy the rugged, steep ascent. That is my nature. And while I would not want to constantly battle against the odds, the raw feeling of accomplishing something that others did not think possible, or leading people beyond where they thought they could go, is extremely gratifying.

R – Resilience

  • One reason I believed that the Starbucks brand would be resilient was because our founding values still resonated, perhaps now more than ever as anxiety and distrust seeped into the popular zeitgeist, and not just in the United States. In addition to our values, Starbucks’ core product would also continue to be relevant. Coffee will never lose its romance. It will always bring people together and be part of conversations in every language, even as the conversations change. Coffee will forever connect.

B – Brand

  • Our ongoing challenge is to creatively nurture coffee’s essence, keeping it personal despite our size. I do not want Starbucks to be defined solely by its thousands of stores or millions of customers. More than our scale, the brand can and should be defined by the quality of its coffee as well as its value. Community. Connection. Respect. Dignity. Humor. Humanity. Accountability. It is our mission to make sure the world sees us through those lenses.

U – Uniqueness

  • Unlike other retailers that sold coffee, the equity of Starbucks’ brand was steeped in the unique experience customers have from the moment they walk into a store. The aroma. The sense of community. The familial relationships customers establish with their local baristas. And the pride they feel knowing that their purchases support our high standards and socially responsible partners. Reinvigorating the Starbucks Experience could provide the meaningful differentiation that would separate us from competitors.

C – Coffee

  • Roasting coffee beans is a delicate process requiring a thoughtful, exacting balancing act of time and temperature. Any coffee producer that truly cares about quality has a toasting philosophy, and at Starbucks our philosophy is to roast every bean to its peak of flavor in a manner that extracts its maximum potential. This means Starbucks roasts beans for longer than most commercial roasters for a so-called Full City roasts that pulls out the beans’ honest richness, flavor, and acidity, or brightness. Our professional roasters are constantly refining our roasting process. Over the years, they have customized our machines and developed proprietary software to help control and replicate their techniques. We take tremendous pride in knowing that no one in the coffee business has more control over the roasting process than Starbucks. Like roasting, blending specialty coffee is also an art form, and our blenders’ culinary talents are akin to those of master chefs. Most coffee companies mix different types of beans together as a way to mask inferior coffee, but Starbucks has always used blending as an opportunity to elevate coffees from parts of the world. Sometimes, in order to capture each bean’s peak flavor, we won’t even roast different beans together; only after roasting do we combine them. And when beans from multiple regions are blended just right, they create a unique symphony of flavor that does not exist by itself.

K – Knowledge

  • Entrepreneurs are builders, and the lens through which I view Starbucks and the marketplace is somewhat different from what it would be if I were a professionally schooled manager. Such a lens has, however, its strengths and weaknesses. On the plus side, founders know every brick in the foundation. We know what inspired the company and what was required to create it. That knowledge, that history brings with it a high level of passion to do whatever it takes to succeed, as well as intuition about what is right and what is wrong. But sometimes we are too close to a situation. Entrepreneurs can be blinded by emotion, by our love of what we have built, unable to see it fresh and with the eyes of a more objective outside.

S – Spirit

  • If the barista only goes through the motions, if he or she does not care and produces an inferior espresso that is too weak or too bitter, then Starbucks has lost the essence of what we set out to do 40 years ago: inspire the human spirit.

To learn more about how SMEI can help you with marketing visit www.smei.org